Discussion:
debian-6.0.7-amd64 how to set resolution and refresh for free NVIDIA X drivers?
(too old to reply)
David Christensen
2013-04-09 16:59:32 UTC
Permalink
debian-user:

I have an Asus M2NPV-VM motherboard with integrated NVIDIA GeForce 6150
graphics and a fresh install of debian-6.0.7-amd64, XFCE desktop, and
xdm display manager. The display seems to be running at 1024x768 @ 60 Hz.

I booted in recovery mode and ran:

# Xorg -configure

which created /root/xorg.conf.new. But when I try to use that file, X
hangs when starting.

I have used the proprietary NVIDIA driver in the past, but would like to
use the free Debian drivers instead.

1. I can determine the current resolution and refresh via Start ->
System -> Preferences -> Monitors, but I cannot change those settings.

2. How do I determine the current color depth (e.g. 8/16/24 bits per
pixel)?

3. How do I change the display settings -- resolution, refresh, color
depth?


TIA,

David
Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-09 17:21:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Christensen
I have an Asus M2NPV-VM motherboard with integrated NVIDIA GeForce 6150
graphics and a fresh install of debian-6.0.7-amd64, XFCE desktop, and
# Xorg -configure
which created /root/xorg.conf.new. But when I try to use that file, X
hangs when starting.
I have used the proprietary NVIDIA driver in the past, but would like to
use the free Debian drivers instead.
1. I can determine the current resolution and refresh via Start ->
System -> Preferences -> Monitors, but I cannot change those settings.
2. How do I determine the current color depth (e.g. 8/16/24 bits per
pixel)?
3. How do I change the display settings -- resolution, refresh, color
depth?
I recommend to use a more or less classical xorg.conf. I'm still using
CRTs myself.
$ cat /mnt/q/etc/X11/xorg.conf
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "X.org Configured"
Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
EndSection

Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0"
DisplaySize 305 230
HorizSync 29-98
VertRefresh 50-120
modeline "1152x864" 128.42 1152 1232 1360 1568 864 865 868 910
Gamma 1.0
EndSection

Section "Device"
Identifier "Card0"
Driver "radeon"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "Card0"
Monitor "Monitor0"
SubSection "Display"
Viewport 0 0
Depth 24
Modes "1152x864"
EndSubSection
EndSection

Depending to the used card, I get different options to set up different
resolutions and frequencies by the Xfce GUI, with equal settings for the
monitor. There are more choices for my NVIDIA card. However usually I
need 1152x864 at a much higher rate than even 70Hz, currently it's 90Hz
and that's ok.

Useful information would be the vendor and model of your monitor and
your xorg.conf.
David Christensen
2013-04-09 21:19:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
... fresh install of debian-6.0.7-amd64, XFCE desktop, and xdm display manager.
I've since wiped the drive and done a fresh reinstall using defaults:

desktop is gnome 1:2.30+7

display manager is gdm3 2.30.5-6squeeze4
Post by Ralf Mardorf
Useful information would be the vendor and model of your monitor
Nokia 445XiPlus.

I usually run this at 1600x1200, 85 Hz, 24 bpp.
Post by Ralf Mardorf
and your xorg.conf.
There is no /etc/X11/xorg.conf on the system -- X hangs if this file exists.

xorg.conf.new and Xorg.0.log are here:


http://holgerdanske.com/users/dpchrist/bug-reports/debian/squeeze/amd64/X/

David
Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-09 21:43:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Christensen
Post by Ralf Mardorf
... fresh install of debian-6.0.7-amd64, XFCE desktop, and xdm display manager.
desktop is gnome 1:2.30+7
display manager is gdm3 2.30.5-6squeeze4
Post by Ralf Mardorf
Useful information would be the vendor and model of your monitor
Nokia 445XiPlus.
I usually run this at 1600x1200, 85 Hz, 24 bpp.
Post by Ralf Mardorf
and your xorg.conf.
There is no /etc/X11/xorg.conf on the system -- X hangs if this file exists.
http://holgerdanske.com/users/dpchrist/bug-reports/debian/squeeze/amd64/X/
David
I would boot it with xorg.conf available and after it failed run

grep EE /etc/X11/xorg.conf

or where ever it should be located, /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/?*

When opening your links they were not good formatted, but there are
mouse and keyboard settings. Removing mouse and keyboard from xorg.conf
might help.
Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-09 21:46:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
I would boot it with xorg.conf available and after it failed run
grep EE /etc/X11/xorg.conf
or where ever it should be located, /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/?*
When opening your links they were not good formatted, but there are
mouse and keyboard settings. Removing mouse and keyboard from xorg.conf
might help.
:D

I'm sorry, it should be

grep EE /var/log/Xorg.0.log
Jonathan Dowland
2013-04-10 14:53:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
When opening your links they were not good formatted,
they are being sent (incorrectly) as content-type: text/html, so web browsers
Post by Ralf Mardorf
$ GET http://holgerdanske.com/users/dpchrist/bug-reports/debian/squeeze/amd64/X/a64x23800p-20130409-140018-xorg.conf.new
Benjamin Egner
2013-04-09 22:12:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
Post by David Christensen
I have an Asus M2NPV-VM motherboard with integrated NVIDIA GeForce 6150
graphics and a fresh install of debian-6.0.7-amd64, XFCE desktop, and
# Xorg -configure
which created /root/xorg.conf.new. But when I try to use that file, X
hangs when starting.
I have used the proprietary NVIDIA driver in the past, but would like to
use the free Debian drivers instead.
1. I can determine the current resolution and refresh via Start ->
System -> Preferences -> Monitors, but I cannot change those settings.
2. How do I determine the current color depth (e.g. 8/16/24 bits per
pixel)?
3. How do I change the display settings -- resolution, refresh, color
depth?
I recommend to use a more or less classical xorg.conf. I'm still using
CRTs myself.
$ cat /mnt/q/etc/X11/xorg.conf
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "X.org Configured"
Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
EndSection
Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Monitor0"
DisplaySize 305 230
HorizSync 29-98
VertRefresh 50-120
modeline "1152x864" 128.42 1152 1232 1360 1568 864 865 868 910
Gamma 1.0
EndSection
Section "Device"
Identifier "Card0"
Driver "radeon"
EndSection
Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "Card0"
Monitor "Monitor0"
SubSection "Display"
Viewport 0 0
Depth 24
Modes "1152x864"
EndSubSection
EndSection
Depending to the used card, I get different options to set up different
resolutions and frequencies by the Xfce GUI, with equal settings for the
monitor. There are more choices for my NVIDIA card. However usually I
need 1152x864 at a much higher rate than even 70Hz, currently it's 90Hz
and that's ok.
Useful information would be the vendor and model of your monitor and
your xorg.conf.
Last time I had trouble with monitor resolutions, I dealt with it using
`xrandr'.
Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-09 22:31:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Benjamin Egner
Last time I had trouble with monitor resolutions, I dealt with it using
`xrandr'
I found a German Wiki, since the OP has got a German email adresse I'll
post it:

http://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/RandR

I don't know if it does work, at least the modeline differs, if I use
the values my monitor does run in real live, using the xorg.conf.


[***@archlinux ~]$ grep modeli /etc/X11/xorg.conf
modeline "1152x864" 128.42 1152 1232 1360 1568 864 865 868 910
[***@archlinux ~]$ cvt 1152 864 90
# 1152x864 89.80 Hz (CVT) hsync: 81.99 kHz; pclk: 127.25 MHz
Modeline "1152x864_90.00" 127.25 1152 1232 1352 1552 864 867 871 913 -hsync +vsync

And how can the depth be set?
http://www.x.org/archive/X11R7.5/doc/man/man1/xrandr.1.html

I didn't read it, I just searched by Ctrl+F.
Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-09 22:32:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
I found a German Wiki, since the OP has got a German email adresse
Oops, I guess I'm mistaken and sorry for the HTML.
Jonathan Dowland
2013-04-10 14:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
I recommend to use a more or less classical xorg.conf. I'm still using
CRTs myself.
OP beware, please do not try something like Ralf's xorg.conf yourself.
For a start, it specifies the radeon driver; but it also declares modelines
that may not be appropriate to your monitor, which in extreme cases could
result in hardware damage, apparently.

Modern X should not require any xorg.conf at all, with all relevant information
automatically detected, and the goal here should be to get you to a desired
resolution without introducing one.
Morel Bérenger
2013-04-10 08:51:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Christensen
I have used the proprietary NVIDIA driver in the past, but would like to
use the free Debian drivers instead.
Free NVidia drivers by Debian does *not* exists. There is only a package
which installs NVidia's drivers.

The easier and simpler, if you do not need good 3D acceleration is to
install "nouveau" instead of NVidia, which is a driver made from reverse
engineering.
In last kernels (around 3.8), it seems that there is also support for
better 3D acceleration, however I did not tried it since Debian at the
moment only have that kernel in experimental (and when I tried it, few
things broke. Did not investigate though).

Nouveau have the very good feature of not needing any Xorg.conf file: you
install it, you boot with it, it detects everything alone.

In short:
_ nouveau: free software, perfect integration in the system, average and
unfinished support (in linux 3.2 kernel) of 3D harware acceleration,
support all cards: both new and old(nouveau-vieu is what you would want).
_ NVidia: proprietary software, bad integration in the system, support for
advanced 3D features, no support for old cards.
Post by David Christensen
2. How do I determine the current color depth (e.g. 8/16/24 bits per
pixel)?
IIRC:
xrandr --output <port you used: VGA, HMDI, etc> --list
Post by David Christensen
3. How do I change the display settings -- resolution, refresh, color
depth?
xrandr --output <port you used> --mode <your parameters>

Play with xrandr in a terminal emulator, and when you have what you want,
add the command to your DE's startup list (depends on your DEs)
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Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-10 09:28:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Morel Bérenger
In last kernels (around 3.8), it seems that there is also support for
better 3D acceleration
Nouveau was a PITA for a long time, but nowadays it usually works like a
charm, 3D acceleration is very good.
Post by Morel Bérenger
xrandr
As mentioned by me in a previous post. You might need a modeline and
you can get the needed values by

The command "cvt <resolution v-frequency>, e.g.:

cvt 1152 864 90

Regards,
Ralf
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Morel Bérenger
2013-04-10 09:49:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
Post by Morel Bérenger
In last kernels (around 3.8), it seems that there is also support for
better 3D acceleration
Nouveau was a PITA for a long time, but nowadays it usually works like a
charm, 3D acceleration is very good.
It is not still not working like a charm, since I tried kernel 3.8 to try
a game (regnum online, bugged as hell, but at least it have a linux client
which is playable) which perfectly works with official NVidia. The result
with nouveau of 3.8 was only a black screen (for 3.2 the game simply said
that some features were lacking and closed).

Another problem I know by following linuxfr, is that automatic adjustment
of fan speed according to temperature is not functional. At least,
according to a guy who claimed to be a contributor of nouveau :) (I did
not checked his assertions, I have other things to do than mistrust people
which give fairly good technical explanations and are recognized by more
ancient people of the community than me)

There is still a lack of support for dual card configuration (I have such
configuration, but I do not use it anyway: my two cards are just cheap
ones and the second were bought after an error of mine about which
component of my computer was out of order...) and IIRC card switching that
we can find in some portable computers.

Of course, those features which are lacking are only for special cases,
and for all other stuff, nouveau is really good, my intent is not to deny
that fact, and I am waiting impatiently to see the 3.8 kernel in debian
testing, to get rid of that piece of crap named nvidia drivers, which only
give me problems and the ability to play one or two games I could not
otherwise play (nexuiz is still unplayable with nouveau 3.2 too, but it's
engine really became a PITA in performance point of view).

Wesnoth, unvanquished, openmw and so many other which have a free engine
works like a charm (on the graphic point of view, since I have real
problems with unvanquished, which I should try to solve, one day, because
this game is a really good -and different than average FPS- one).

Anyway, nouveau have always (since I know it, so, not so many time, maybe
2 years :D) be the best when you have no need for 3D features.
And now, 3D features are coming, so, I will profit from that message to
say "Good job, guys, and thanks you a lot!" to it's developers.
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Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-10 10:02:24 UTC
Permalink
Yes, AFAIK all your claims a correct! I needed the nv driver for a long
time, because nouveau completely didn't work, today it can be possible
(but it also still can be impossible) to use 3D and even to use the
driver for real-time applications, even for cards that completely didn't
work in the past. It's much better than it was a long time ago.

At the moment I use my ATI, it seems to be less good supported than my
NVIDIA. I switch the cards from time to time, regarding to unusual
needs, in my case it's audio real-time.

I still use xorg.conf, but it could be that xrandr does work as good as
the xorg.conf does work.
Morel Bérenger
2013-04-10 12:25:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ralf Mardorf
Yes, AFAIK all your claims a correct! I needed the nv driver for a long
time, because nouveau completely didn't work, today it can be possible (but
it also still can be impossible) to use 3D and even to use the driver for
real-time applications, even for cards that completely didn't work in the
past. It's much better than it was a long time ago.
At the moment I use my ATI, it seems to be less good supported than my
NVIDIA. I switch the cards from time to time, regarding to unusual
needs, in my case it's audio real-time.
I still use xorg.conf, but it could be that xrandr does work as good as
the xorg.conf does work.
The main interest of xrandr in my opinion is, that it is far easier to
play with than what I can easily name the ugly Xorg.conf.
Here are some examples:
_ user can configure his screen himself, no need to sudo or su
_ no need to restart anything, it's dynamic. You can
add/move/remove/resize screens without any problem at your will.
_ far easier to learn for a beginner: it took less than 10 minutes, while
Xorg.conf will require hours of web browsing. And web browsing without a
good resolution is a pain in...
_ if your multiple screens have different resolutions, there is no "ghost
space", so you can not loose your mouse cursor.
_ it have nice GUI interfaces (I do not use them, but I think it is a
power to have some) like lxrandr. So if you want a normal user to use it,
he will not need to learn anything :)

Considering that my 2 computers are some of the cheapest I know about (an
eeepc laptop and a desktop repaired multiple times with 2 different
screens, and one which will blow it's 10th candle this year, with its
1024x768 max resolution :D) this power of the randr extension is really
comfortable.

And nouveau supports all of this out of the box since at least 2 years,
unlike NVidia.

I think you should take a look at this
http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/FeatureMatrix if you want to have a
good viewing of were it is for your GPU.

Just one question: what is the link between audio stuff and graphic card?
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Ralf Mardorf
2013-04-10 13:10:11 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Apr 2013 14:25:59 +0200, Morel B=E9renger =
Just one question: what is the link between audio stuff and graphic ca=
rd?

One claim is, that shared memory could cause issues. I own a card with =

it's own memory and currently I use an onboard device, that does share R=
AM =

for frame buffer. I can't confirm this claim. Shared memory seemingly =

never caused issues for me.

Sometimes when getting xruns (audio glitches), they can go away when usi=
ng =

another graphics or graphics driver.

Using proprietary drivers sometimes doesn't work with real-time patched =
=

kernels, regarding to licensing issues. There are workarounds to ignore =
=

the license, that often do not work. Instead of using a real-time kernl,=
=

it's possible to use a full preempted kernel and as boot option using =

"threadirqs", however, a real-time patched kernel still could be a littl=
e =

bit better than a full preempted and since the hardware registers aren't=
=

accessible directly by PCs, as it is possible for the C64, Atari ST, PC =
=

anyway don't have that good real-time abilities, so IMO it's better to u=
se =

a rt-patched kernel.

Last but not least, as for all hardware, the graphics could share the IR=
Q =

with the sound device, fortunately modern kernels seem to ensure that th=
e =

graphics get it's own IRQ.

On my machine 2 USB ports, the graphics and my sound card share IRQ 18. =
=

With modern kernels, the graphics gets another IRQ and I wrote a script =
to =

unbind the USB ports.

Regards,
Ralf
Jonathan Dowland
2013-04-10 14:43:32 UTC
Permalink
[Nouveau]'s not still not working like a charm, since I tried kernel 3.8 to
try a game (regnum online, bugged as hell, but at least it have a linux
client which is playable) which perfectly works with official NVidia. The
result with nouveau of 3.8 was only a black screen (for 3.2 the game simply
said that some features were lacking and closed).
For *you*, which does not mean that this is the experience for *everyone*.
Therefore there's no reason to try and discourage *anyone else* from using
Nouveau, unless you know categorically what in particular about your setup
is to blame for your troubles (e.g. a specific video card), and the person
you are discouraging has the same setup.
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Morel Bérenger
2013-04-10 15:10:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Dowland
[Nouveau]'s not still not working like a charm, since I tried kernel 3.8 to
try a game (regnum online, bugged as hell, but at least it have a linux
client which is playable) which perfectly works with official NVidia. The
result with nouveau of 3.8 was only a black screen (for 3.2 the game
simply said that some features were lacking and closed).
For *you*, which does not mean that this is the experience for
*everyone*.
Therefore there's no reason to try and discourage *anyone else* from using
Nouveau, unless you know categorically what in particular about your
setup is to blame for your troubles (e.g. a specific video card), and the
person you are discouraging has the same setup.
Of course, those features which are lacking are only for special cases,
and for all other stuff, nouveau is really good, my intent is not to deny
that fact, and I am waiting impatiently to see the 3.8 kernel in debian
testing, to get rid of that piece of crap named nvidia drivers, which only
give me problems and the ability to play one or two games I could not
otherwise play
This other part of my message was also explaining that it depends on the
needs of the person which want to try it.
The cases were it currently does not fit the needs of people is when heavy
3D acceleration, optimius support, or dynamic fan speed depending on
temperature is needed.
In other situations, I have not said it was not a good idea, did I?
I also said that the kernel 3.8 seems to have a fairly bettre version of
nouveau driver, which I was not able to test efficiently due to problems I
did not even tried to diagnose and fix.

I thought it was clear, but is sounds it was not, so I present my
apologies, and thanks you to have fixed my unclear words.
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David Christensen
2013-05-11 21:27:32 UTC
Permalink
debian-user:

I have an Asus M2NPV-VM motherboard connected to a IOGEAR GCS78 KVM
connected to a Nokia 445XiPlus monitor. The system has Debian 6.0.7
amd64 with the XFCE desktop and the default X driver/server/whatever
(nouveau).

As configured, the system comes up at 1024x768 @ 60 Hz. I am unable to
obtain higher bandwidth resolutions and refresh rates via Debian ->
System -> Preferences -> Monitors. If I attempt to provide any
xorg.conf (including an empty file), nouveau hangs during boot:


http://holgerdanske.com/users/dpchrist/bug-reports/debian/squeeze/amd64/X/

If I eliminate the KVM and connect the motherboard directly to a monitor
(a Nokia 445Xi), the system comes up at 1600x1200 @ 75 Hz (e.g. maximum
supported by the monitor, the video chip can do more) and I am able to
obtain numerous low to high bandwidth resolutions and refresh rates via
the GUI.

Apparently:

1. The KVM is not passing EDID requests/ responses.

2. The nouveau driver doesn't support xorg.conf.

I obtain essentially the same results with Debian 7.0.0 amd64.

How do I provide monitor information to nouveau so that the system comes
up at a chosen high bandwidth resolution/ refresh rate with the KVM
installed (e.g. no EDID)?

TIA,

David
Stan Hoeppner
2013-05-11 23:43:33 UTC
Permalink
On 5/11/2013 4:27 PM, David Christensen wrote:
...
Post by David Christensen
1. The KVM is not passing EDID requests/ responses.
2. The nouveau driver doesn't support xorg.conf.
I obtain essentially the same results with Debian 7.0.0 amd64.
How do I provide monitor information to nouveau so that the system comes
up at a chosen high bandwidth resolution/ refresh rate with the KVM
installed (e.g. no EDID)?
Analog KVM auto switches, especially super cheap ones such as your
IOGEAR, are notoriously finicky when it comes to driving high
resolutions, displaying horrible artifacts, if they can drive the
bandwidth at all. And the longer the cables the worse it gets. They
also rarely pass DDC signals correctly. Ironically the even cheaper
manual switch analog KVMs are better with DDC. If you want to run
1600x1200 I think you're simply asking too much of this KVM, regardless
of the advertised 1920x1440 max resolution in the spec sheet.

I don't have an answer for you as to how you can force the startup res
of your vid card to 1600x1200. But I think if you do find a way, your
KVM and monitor likely aren't going to deal with it very well, if at all.

Your ASUS mobo has a DVI connector, but your monitor does not. If the
monitor did, I'd recommend you switch to a DVI/USB KVM, as that should
eliminate the problem you're having. I'm guessing you don't need all 8
ports. Find a used good quality/brand manual switch analog KVM and see
if that works.

Best of luck. Analog KVMs can be a real PITA...
--
Stan
David Christensen
2013-05-12 02:59:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stan Hoeppner
Analog KVM auto switches, especially super cheap ones such as your
IOGEAR, are notoriously finicky when it comes to driving high
resolutions, displaying horrible artifacts, if they can drive the
bandwidth at all.
The image is acceptable. The monitor has more issues than the KVM.
Post by Stan Hoeppner
They also rarely pass DDC signals correctly.
IOGEAR advertises newer models that query EDID from the monitor and
cache the response for the computers.
Post by Stan Hoeppner
Ironically the even cheaper manual switch analog KVMs are better with DDC.
I had horrible keyboard and mouse problems with manual switches. It
took me several iterations of buy, test, and return to find an
electronic KVM that worked correctly.

David
Stan Hoeppner
2013-05-12 16:33:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Christensen
Post by Stan Hoeppner
Analog KVM auto switches, especially super cheap ones such as your
IOGEAR, are notoriously finicky when it comes to driving high
resolutions, displaying horrible artifacts, if they can drive the
bandwidth at all.
The image is acceptable. The monitor has more issues than the KVM.
Post by Stan Hoeppner
They also rarely pass DDC signals correctly.
IOGEAR advertises newer models that query EDID from the monitor and
cache the response for the computers.
Post by Stan Hoeppner
Ironically the even cheaper manual switch analog KVMs are better with DDC.
I had horrible keyboard and mouse problems with manual switches. It
took me several iterations of buy, test, and return to find an
electronic KVM that worked correctly.
When VMware workstation arrived over a decade ago, then Linux
hypervisors, the need for desktop KVM switches began to wane, and
eventually I was KVM free. I still use auto KVMs in server racks but
there are no issues with 132x50 text consoles.
--
Stan
Jonathan Dowland
2013-04-10 14:46:42 UTC
Permalink
David,

Since you are willing and able to reinstall from scratch, it may be worth
trying the next release of Debian, currently considered 'testing', known
as 'wheezy'. You can get wheezy Release Candidate 1 release installation
media from here:

<http://www.debian.org/devel/debian-installer/>

Wheezy is to be released imminently, so it should not be significantly more
unstable to use than you would expect from a stable release. However it is
much newer than squeeze, and the open source nouveau driver has been under
rapid development, so the version in wheezy is likely to have a much larger
set of supported cards, and many bugs squashed compared to squeeze.

Once you've done that, if you could try attaching a Xorg.0.log that results
in running X *without an xorg.conf*, that may be useful too.

Cheers
Sven Joachim
2013-04-10 15:17:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Dowland
Since you are willing and able to reinstall from scratch, it may be worth
trying the next release of Debian, currently considered 'testing', known
as 'wheezy'. You can get wheezy Release Candidate 1 release installation
<http://www.debian.org/devel/debian-installer/>
Wheezy is to be released imminently, so it should not be significantly more
unstable to use than you would expect from a stable release. However it is
much newer than squeeze, and the open source nouveau driver has been under
rapid development, so the version in wheezy is likely to have a much larger
set of supported cards, and many bugs squashed compared to squeeze.
While this is true in general, there are many known issues with David's
card (GeForce 6150), and I would not recommend to use it with Nouveau.

Cheers,
Sven
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